FAQs: Single equality scheme

SAVE ITEM

22 / 1 / 2009

What are the differences between the general duties as required under Race, Disability and Gender legislation?

If I were to produce a single equality scheme what are some of the things that I need to consider and include?

Are other public sector authorities going down a single equality scheme approach?


What are the differences between the general duties as required under Race, Disability and Gender legislation?

General duties are specified under race, disability and gender legislation.  There are similarities but also differences between these duties.

Race Legislation

The Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000 requires public authorities to:

  • Eliminate unlawful discrimination.
  • Promote equality of opportunity.
  • Promote good relations between persons of differential racial groups.


Disability Legislation

The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 introduces a Disability Equality Duty which requires public authorities to:

  • Promote equality of opportunity between disabled people and other people.
  • Eliminate discrimination that is unlawful under the DDA.
  • Eliminate harassment of disabled people that is related to their disability.
  • Promote positive attitudes towards disabled people.
  • ncourage participation by disabled people in public life.
  • Take steps to meet disabled people’s needs, even if this requires more favourable treatment.

Gender Legislation

The Equality Act 2006 amends the Sex Discrimination Act 1975 to place a general duty on public authorities to:

  • Eliminate unlawful discrimination and harassment.
  • Promote equality of opportunity between men and women.

Mechanisms for successful compliance with the general duties include:

  • Accountability and leadership.
  • Mainstreaming the duty into core functions.
  • Ensuring implementation.
  • Staff expertise and training.

If I were to produce a single equality scheme what are some of the things that I need to consider and include?

There is no fixed format or style for producing single equality schemes. Effective schemes will include a number of areas to ensure effectiveness. This may include:

  • Commitment from senior leaders
  • Links to business plans and the strategic priorities of the organisation.
  • Arrangements for gathering information and analysis
  • Identification of common areas / activities
  • Arrangements for involvement and consultation

Responsibilities and accountability for the implementation of the scheme.
Development of action plans:

  • Identification of individuals with responsibilities
  • Measurable and time bound indicators of progress
  • Allocation of specific budgets
  • How impact assessments will be incorporated into the authority’s decision making process
  • How this will be incorporated into procurement and partnership arrangements
  • Arrangements for monitoring and reviewing their schemes
  • Authorities will need to ensure that their annual reporting processes are distinct and clearly identify progress towards each of the diversity strands and meeting the duties of the individual pieces of legislation.
     

Are other public sector authorities going down a single equality scheme approach?

Many public sector authorities are undertaking consultation exercises in relation to the development of a single equality scheme. Examples can be found on the websites of the Higher Education Funding Council for England and the Crown Prosecution Service.

Why Register?

Great reasons to register with NHS Employers

  • A personalised website
    Manage your profile and select topics of interest to you
  • Access your dashboard
    Bookmark useful content to help you quickly find what your looking for
  • Get involved
    Contribute to our Talking Points discussions, comment on and rate our webpages
  • Keep up to date
    Receive the Workforce bulletin and our other newsletters

Sounds great, what next?

Register Now

Not now, I will register later

Log In