#Blogtober: We all wobble at times

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27 / 10 / 2014 12.01am

By Andrew Moore


#Blogtober Day: Monday 27 October

Like many of you within our community of practice I found myself ending up as a practitioner having followed a winding road of twists and turns throughout my career path taking in both the leisure and travel industries before settling in generalist HR for a number of years, latterly with the NHS. 

This changed when I made the transition to OD and realised that this was my place, this is where I fit and where I wanted to be.  Why? I felt I could align myself and my values very comfortably within my practice.  I have always been passionate about people and their development and recognise that this has given me the most reward over the course of time.  The move also coincided with a particular ‘wobble’ for me personally which I now believe has supported and informed my practice.

It began my thinking that no matter who we are or where we come from we all have a winding path that we travel on to get where we end up, this path has many challenges for us to negotiate on the way.  I, like you, see, hear and feel this every day with the people as individuals and teams in difficulty who we work with.  It seemed that much of our time was spent coming in to support a situation once it was broken, involving tidying up, mending and developing.  The reasons teams and individuals get into difficulty are vast, one reason that we hear often through our work is change.  Clichéd though it may be, it is widely recognised that change is now the only constant. 

So was there anything that we could do differently? I began looking at the literature around personal resilience with a view of proactively ’front loading’ our practice through the introduction of personal resilience learning and interventions within the organisation.  This is work in progress but so far we have introduced personal resilience workshops, a masterclass series with expert speakers, a mindfulness programme to name but a few as well as introducing one to one building resilience conversations.  My experience of the work is largely positive through the creation of space and permission for us to think about personal resilience.  It is also heartening to recognise the positive impact that colleagues get from hearing each other and myself as a practitioner putting my ‘self’ in that space alongside them that hey we all wobble from time to time, let’s look at what’s out there that might support us.

In the confusion, anxiety and emotions that permeate the dynamic of helping others and facilitating change, the process ultimately begins and ends with our internal landscape of characteristics, values, beliefs, and assumptions.  In short, the structures that makes up consciousness and ‘self’ (Jamieson, Schectman and Auron, 2010)

References
Jamieson, D. W., Auron, M. And Shechtman, D. (2010) Managing use of self for Masterful Professional Practice, OD Practitioner, Vol 42 (No 3), pp. 4 – 10.

Andrew has worked within the NHS for eight years; having previously worked in people management and development in both the private and third sectors for over 25 years.  One key area of his work is in relation to personal resilience.  This includes supporting the creation of space for people to think about their resilience through workshops and the introduction of resilience learning within the organisation.  Andrew is undertaking a Professional Doctoral programme within this subject area. Andrew can be contacted via Twitter @NHSAndrewM or email address.

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