Responsibilities for research and development

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This factor measures the responsibilities of the job for informal and formal clinical or non-clinical research and development (R&D) activities underpinned by appropriate methodology and documentation, including formal testing or evaluation of drugs, or clinical or non-clinical equipment.

It takes into account the nature of the responsibility (initiation, implementation, oversight of research and development activities), whether it is an integral part of the work or research for personal development purposes, and the degree to which it is shared with others.

Level 1:    Undertakes surveys or audits, as necessary to own work;
may occasionally participate in R&D, clinical trials or equipment testing.
Level 2:            (a) Regularly undertakes R&D activity as a requirement of the job, or
b) regularly undertakes clinical trials, or
(c) regularly undertakes equipment testing or adaptation.
Level 3:        Carries out research or development work as part of one
or more formal research programmes or activities as a major job requirement.
Level 4:         Responsible for co-ordinating and implementing R&D
programmes or activity as a requirement of the job.
Level 5: Responsible, as an integral part of the job, for initiating
(which may involve securing funding) and developing R&D programmes or activities, which support the objectives of the broader organisation.
Level 6: Responsible, as an integral part of the job, for initiating and developing R&D programmes,
which have an impact outside the organisation for example NHS-wide or outside the health service.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Definitions and notes: 

Research and development (all levels) this includes testing of, drugs and equipment and other forms of formal non-clinical research (such as human resources, communications, health education) as well as formal clinical research. This factor measures the requirement for active direct participation in research or trials and does not include indirect involvement as a result of a patient being involved in the research.

Occasionally (level 1) one or two such projects or activities per year.

Undertaking audits (level 1) includes building and facilities audits or surveys, functional audits, clinical audits. Specific, one-off complex audits using research methodology should be counted as R&D activity (level 2a).

Undertakes R&D activity (level 2a) includes complex audits using research methodology for example specific one-off audits designed to improve a particular area or service. It also includes the collation of research results.

Undertakes clinical trials or equipment testing (levels 2b and 2c) is appropriate where active participation is required.

Regularly (levels 2a, 2b and 2c) is appropriate where it is a regular feature of the work, normally identified in a job description, with relevant activity on average at least once a month and usually more frequently.

Major job requirement (level 3) indicates a continuing involvement for at least some part of every working week (20 per cent or more per week on average). This level is only appropriate where the jobholder normally has at least one project ongoing requiring this amount of involvement. Where the high-level involvement is only required for a one-off project, the job should be assessed according to the normal degree of involvement. Formal audits/investigations which meet the continuing involvement criteria should also be included at this level.

Co-ordinating and implementing R&D programmes (level 4) includes taking overall control of a local, regional or national programme, which may be managed elsewhere. It also includes project management of R&D activities.

An integral part of the job (level 5) is appropriate where R&D is a significant part of the job and takes up a substantial amount of working time.

Initiating and developing (level 6) is appropriate where the jobholder is required to specify and develop R&D programmes and get these off the ground.

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